Curt Wechsler, The World Can't Wait: February 2012 Archives
"The moral queasiness that we must feel about this method of extracting information from those in our clutches has all but disappeared these days, thanks to the national shame of 'enhanced interrogation techniques' at Guantánamo - Colin Dayan, Barbarous Confinement

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UPDATE: In what he himself calls "a leap of faith", Guantanamo prisoner Majid Khan has cut a deal with the government, agreeing never to sue the U.S. or its agencies for his treatment. The judge also stipulated that Khan could continue to be held as a 'law of war detainee' even after he has served his sentence of 19 years.

Except that, as in Majid Khan's case, above, they won't. More on the dangers of plea bargaining here and here.
What happens to everybody else?

Massachusetts town vows to defy indefinite detention law

"WHEREAS, the indefinite detention of any person without trial violates the 5th and 6th amendments of the Constitution of the United States, Article III of the Constitution of the United States, and the Posse Comitatus Act...
"arbitrary detention is as unacceptable when applied to foreign Muslims held at Guantánamo as it is when possibly directed at US citizens - Andy Worthington
A U.S. soldier wields his assault rifle as another soldier handles a shotgun while standing at the gate of Bagram airbase during a protest against Quran desecration on Feb. 21. (Massoud Hossaini / AFP - Getty Images)

Thousands of Afghans are protesting outside of the Bagram Air Base today, after Afghans working inside the facility revealed that US military personnel were burning large numbers of Qurans at the base... 
A number of Afghan workers were also injured during the burning, when they realized that Qurans were being destroyed and attempted to pull them out of the fire, suffering serious burns.

Instead of handing over the main detention center in Afghanistan to Kabul's control, the U.S. is expanding the facility and keeping it under Washington's control...

"Welcome to a special broadcast by Project Censored on Pacifica Radio. Join Mickey Huff, along with co-hosts Dr. Peter Phillips; Dr. Andy Roth, the associate director of Project Censored; and Abby Martin of Media Roots. Today's special program is "Brought to Justice? -- The Indefinite Detention and Targeted Killing of the Rule of Law." Joining us will be investigative journalist Andy Worthington, author of The Guantánamo Files and co-director of "Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo"; Pardiss Kebriaei, an attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights, who has represented a number of the men detained at Guantánamo and is also counsel in Al-Aulaqi v. Obama, which concerns targeted killings by the executive in zones outside of armed conflict. We will also have music and commentary from one of the most notable political folk musicians of our time, the one and only David Rovics. We hear from Dr. Almerindo Ojeda, professor of linguistics and director of the Guantánamo Testimonials Project at University of California, Davis; and we round out today's special with Stephanie Tang of World Can't Wait...

c/o The Orange County Register:

431544115.jpgDarmer... took a stand on waterboarding, including during a Chapman debate with John Yoo, a former Bush administration lawyer whose memos justified coercive interrogation tactics including waterboarding.

"Prior to the War on Terror, we took the position that waterboarding was torture and prosecuted it as such," Darmer said of the interrogation method. "How effective is a tactic you have to use 266 times? We are lawyers. Our job is to follow the law. Torture is illegal, and it's also wrong."

opposition to lawsuits for rendition abuses has affected other nations' "perceptions of our stature and our moral legitimacy" -  Joe "Chip" Pitts, Stanford law school lecturer and former chairman of Amnesty International USA
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba, Cuba - Marines assigned to Marine Security Force Company run with their unit guidon in the MCSF Co.'s half-marathon along the Leeward fence line of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, October 1.  MCSF Co. hosts several events as part of a fundraising effort for the Marine Corps Birthday Ball scheduled to be held in November. (JTF Guantanamo photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Mathieu Perry)

Rear Adm. David "Woody" Woods, far left, Joint Task Force Guantanamo commander, cuts the ribbon during the opening ceremony of the Media Operations Center, October 12, 2011. (photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Mathieu Perry)

Woods will soon be relieved of his post at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, where his misadventures led to clashes with defense attorneys over the illegal search of confidential correspondence between prisoners and their counsel. 

In Smithfield, NC, protesters regularly gather at the small airport to press their demand for an investigation into Aero Contractors, a private company rumored to have ties to the CIA and its "extraordinary rendition" program of secret detentions.

10 years after the first "high-value" detainee was hooded and forced into a CIA plane, Aero's presence remains for opponents a powerful symbol: a rare, visible reminder of what they view as a uniquely shameful chapter in America's history...

"Our journey toward Abu Ghraib began in earnest with a single document -- written and signed without the knowledge of the American People...

"In beginning to tell the stories of the remaining 171 prisoners at Guantanamo, we are 
delighted to start with the story of Abdul Razak Qadir, one of five Uighurs, Muslims from 
China's Xinjiang province...

On January 13th, Andy Worthington introduced a 
new Close Guantanamo Now! petition to his 
Bay Area audience. Find video of the event, 
A Conversation With Truthout Journalist 
Jason Leopold, here.

779 prisoners have been held at Guantanamo since 
the prison opened on January 11, 2002. Of those, 
600 have been released or transferred, and eight
have died. 

The remaining men are human beings, with feelings, and with families, who, after 
ten years, continue to be subjected to arbitrary detention.