Results matching “john eastman” from FIRE JOHN YOO!

Was John Eastman, former Chapman legal scholar, trying to overthrow  democracy? - Orange County Register

John Eastman conceded that his scheme represented violation of the Electoral Count Act but urged Mike Pence to go ahead anyway, calling it a "minor violation." 

So "minor" that House counsel Douglas Letter quipped "It was so minor it could have changed the entire course of our democracy. It could have meant the popularly elected president could have been thwarted from taking office. That was what Dr Eastman was urging."

Jerry Elsea also hates it when lawyers spin lies for presidents, especially when their "legal" advice "shreds the Constitution and shoves the presidency toward autocracy... 

"When President Biden reviews the election overthrow attempt, will he bring the plotters to justice? Or will he do as Obama did with those who had plunged into the dark domain of torture, simply saying, 'Look forward, not backward?'

"A weaseling out would signal further erosion of justice and a move toward autocracy under a reinstalled Trump or one his acolytes. With the help of crafty attorneys, of course."


JohnEastman9c.jpg

John Eastman--the former Chapman University law school dean whose most famous education maneuver was bringing his pal and disgraced Bush torture memo author John Yoo to the private Orange institution to pollute future legal minds and defend himself--wanted to dupe voters by being listed as "assistant attorney general" or "special assistant attorney general" in campaign materials and on the June 8 Republican primary ballot. - OC Weekly


"And so while my campaign for Attorney General ends this morning, the campaign for our agenda does not.  We must restore feudalism federalism, fight unconstitutional pension spikes, fight illegal immigration, protect marriage, defend small businesses from excessive regulation and litigation, and; comprehensively, restore the constitutional limits on government, to bring our state back." - John Eastman


photo by Christopher Victorio 

Yoo's pal caught

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JohnEastman9c.jpgJohn Eastman former Chapman University law school dean whose most famous education maneuver was bringing his pal and disgraced Bush torture memo author John Yoo to the private Orange institution to pollute future legal minds and defend himself--wanted to dupe voters by being listed as "assistant attorney general" or "special assistant attorney general" in campaign materials and on the June 8 Republican primary ballot.

see John Eastman Dealt Legal Blow in GOP Race for State AG


Photo by Christopher Victorio

Torture: academia's godchild

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John Eastman Resigns as Chapman Law School Dean to Run for State Attorney General

By Matt Coker, OC Weekly, January 28 2010

Eastman.jpg

Controversial conservative legal scholar John Eastman, who brought his buddy and Bush torture memo author John Yoo to Orange County to teach law last year, is stepping down as dean of Chapman University's law school to run for California attorney general...

Will he be joining John Yoo's other cohort at the California Department of Justice?

'Torture Memos' vs. Academic Freedom

A review of a Berkeley law professor's memos to the White House about counterterrorism policies prompts calls for his job


When people gathered last May for the commencement ceremony at the University of California at Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law, they were greeted by chanting activists from the National Lawyers Guild and other left-wing groups.

The university, protesters shouted, should fire John C. Yoo, a tenured professor who has taught at the law school since 1993. While on leave at the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel between 2001 and 2003, Mr. Yoo drafted what have come to be known as the "torture memos" -- a series of secret memoranda that gave benediction to President George W. Bush's interrogation and surveillance policies.

Some scholars believe that Mr. Yoo's memoranda were so shoddy that they amounted to professional misconduct. Several of those critics also think that Mr. Yoo's academic job should be in jeopardy. But others -- including some who agree that Mr. Yoo's memoranda were pernicious -- argue that penalizing Mr. Yoo for his work in Washington could set a troubling precedent for academic freedom.

Now the debate over Mr. Yoo's presence at Berkeley has taken on new urgency. At the beginning of March, the government released several previously undisclosed memoranda by Mr. Yoo. And the Justice Department will soon complete a review of his conduct. According to a Newsweek report, the department might allege that Mr. Yoo improperly colluded with the White House to craft justifications for dubious counterterrorist policies. It could be the credible charge of misconduct that critics have been waiting for.

A Higher Standard

At the center of the storm sits Christopher Edley Jr., dean of Boalt Hall, who is fielding anxious phone calls from faculty members and students.

more on Chapman debate

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The Trial of John Yoo

THE MOVING TARGET blog  April 21, 2009 

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John Yoo

I have just returned from a debate on presidential power at Chapman University Law School.

In retrospect, the event should more properly have been called "The Trial of John Yoo."

And strikingly, it was Yoo who cast himself in the role of defendant.

JOHN YOO STARS IN A MOST CIVILIZED DEBATE ON TORTURE

Tuesday, Apr. 21 2009 
By Matt Coker in A Clockwork Orange, Crime & Sex,Politics
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Photo by Christopher Victorio

As John Yoo makes his case, John C. Eastman is hard at think.

see also OC REGISTER: Bush lawyer defends waterboarding... 

and LA TIMES: Different approaches for two men...

referendum on John Yoo?

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from THE CHRONICLES of a BLAWGIRL

a blawg by julie anne ines

School dean and law prof at Chapman Law debate if former Bush adviser John Yoo fit to teach

10 APRIL 2009 10:51 AM
john-yoo

John Yoo

The Chapman University School of Law dean and a professor at the Orange County, Calif., law school gave LA Times readers a preview of what the upcoming debate between former Bush administration legal adviser John Yoo and professors at the school could look like.

Published in the LA Times Opinion section Thursday, Dean John C. Eastman and professor Lawrence Rosenthal wrote separate pieces arguing whether Chapman visiting professor John Yoo, who teaches at U.C. Berkeley's Boalt Hall, is fit to mold and Socratize young legal minds.

Mr. Rosenthal, whose piece ran above Eastman's, stated that Mr. Yoo should not be teaching because the memos he produced for the Bush administration, including one that said the president could allow torture, were flawed in their legal reasoning.

"A Higher Standard"

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'Torture Memos' vs. Academic Freedom

A review of a Berkeley law professor's memos to the White House about counterterrorism policies prompts calls for his job

By DAVID GLENN The Chronicle of Higher Education From the issue dated March 20, 2009 

When people gathered last May for the commencement ceremony at the University of California at Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law, they were greeted by chanting activists from the National Lawyers Guild and other left-wing groups.

The university, protesters shouted, should fire John C. Yoo, a tenured professor who has taught at the law school since 1993. While on leave at the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel between 2001 and 2003, Mr. Yoo drafted what have come to be known as the "torture memos" -- a series of secret memoranda that gave benediction to President George W. Bush's interrogation and surveillance policies.

Some scholars believe that Mr. Yoo's memoranda were so shoddy that they amounted to professional misconduct. Several of those critics also think that Mr. Yoo's academic job should be in jeopardy. But others -- including some who agree that Mr. Yoo's memoranda were pernicious -- argue that penalizing Mr. Yoo for his work in Washington could set a troubling precedent for academic freedom.

Now the debate over Mr. Yoo's presence at Berkeley has taken on new urgency. At the beginning of March, the government released several previously undisclosed memoranda by Mr. Yoo. And the Justice Department will soon complete a review of his conduct. According to a Newsweek report, the department might allege that Mr. Yoo improperly colluded with the White House to craft justifications for dubious counterterrorist policies. It could be the credible charge of misconduct that critics have been waiting for.

A Higher Standard

At the center of the storm sits Christopher Edley Jr., dean of Boalt Hall, who is fielding anxious phone calls from faculty members and students.

"The analogy on everyone's mind here is the McCarthy era, when professors were harassed and sometimes prosecuted for their outside political endeavors," Mr. Edley says. "That explains the attractiveness of a bright-line rule that requires an actual criminal conviction before a professor can be disciplined for outside work."

But Mr. Edley also says that a higher standard should apply to law professors and other instructors in professional schools. In those fields, Mr. Edley says, the university should investigate credible allegations of serious off-campus professional misconduct, even if a criminal conviction is nowhere in sight.

"Law professors, after all, are charged with preparing the next generation of professionals to live their lives according to our ethical canons," he says.

If the Justice Department's review includes serious allegations, Mr. Edley says, the university might be justified in formally reviewing Mr. Yoo's extracurricular activities. Such a move very likely would be triggered by the universitywide Academic Senate; the dean cannot initiate it. Mr. Edley emphasizes that he is speaking hypothetically, and he says that any punishment need not necessarily include revocation of tenure. The university's rules allow far milder sanctions, including written censure and a reduction in salary.

Watch Keith Olbermann's interview of Scott Horton on MSNBC's Countdown, courtesy of rawstory.com.

John Yoo Hearts Orange County

By Scott Horton, HARPER'S MAGAZINE 

Just as the publication of another batch of his memos--repudiated by the Bush Justice Department just as it was handing the keys over to its successor--is causing quite a stir in legal circles, John Yoo appears in an interview in the Orange County Register.

Bush policymaker escapes Berkeley's wrath

John Yoo at Chapman University
Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times
John Yoo, visiting professor at Chapman University's law school, crafted a policy on harsh interrogation tactics as an attorney for the Justice Department. The policy was later withdrawn.

By Susannah Rosenblatt Los Angeles Times
February 10, 2009

UC Berkeley Professor John Yoo, who crafted the administration's policy on torture, is teaching at Chapman University School of Law in Orange, where the protests against him aren't as intense.

Statement of Dean John C. Eastman 

Regarding the Appointment of Professor John Yoo as the 2009 Fletcher Jones Distinguished Visiting Professor at Chapman University School of Law

 

December 15, 2008 

 

Chapman University officials have received several notes of concern about my decision 

to offer Professor John Yoo a distinguished visitorship at the Chapman University School 

of Law.  Professor Yoo has been a well-regarded member of the law faculty at the 

University of California, Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law since 1993, one of the top 

law schools in the nation.  He visited at the University of Chicago in 2003 and held the 

Distinguished Fulbright Chair in Law at the University of Trento (Italy) in 2006.  While I 

acknowledge the controversy surrounding the legal positions Professor Yoo articulated 

during his tenure as deputy assistant attorney general in the Office of Legal Counsel of 

the U.S. Department of Justice during the administration of President George W. Bush, 

we are very much looking forward to Professor Yoo's visit at Chapman University, 

where our students and, indeed, the entire academic community here at Chapman, can 

engage him in a serious, yet civil, scholarly discussion of the issues on which he provided 

legal counsel while serving in the administration. 

 

In this, our position is not unlike that of Christopher Edley, Professor Yoo's Dean at 

Berkeley, and presently a leading member of President-Elect Barack Obama's transition 

team.  Dean Edley's position in defense of academic freedom is a model for us all.  It is 

available at http://www.law.berkeley.edu/news/2008/edley041008.html.  Dean Edley 

noted that "in Berkeley's classrooms and courtyards our community argues about the 

legal and moral issues with the intensity and discipline these crucial issues deserve. 

Those who prefer to avoid these arguments--be they left or right or lazy--will not find 

Berkeley or any other truly great law school a wholly congenial place to study. For that 

we make no apology." 

 

It would be simple for academic institutions to ignore views from one end or the other of 

the political spectrum.  Indeed, all too many law schools have faculties that are much too 

homogenous with respect to their views on contested matters.  We, on the other hand, 

pride ourselves on having built a law school that is now one of the most ideologically 

diverse in the nation.  Several members of our faculty have clerked at the Supreme Court, 

but the Justices for whom they worked run the gamut on the ideological spectrum, from 

the late Chief Justice Rehnquist and Justice Thomas to Justices Brennan, Stevens, and 

Souter.  This semester we have Richard Falk as our Bette & Wylie Aitken Distinguished 

Visiting Professor.  Professor Falk, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of International Law 

and Practice, Emeritus at Princeton University, is an internationally recognized human 

rights scholar, but also extremely controversial.  He was recently named the U.N.'s 

rapporteur on the Palestinian territories, but his views are so hostile to Israel that Israel 

has denied him a visa.  He has in addition authored the preface to a book that argues that 

the Bush administration was complicit in the attacks on September 11, commending the 

book for its "single coherent account" of the accusations, and he is listed by David 

Horowitz as one of "The 101 Most Dangerous Academics in America."  I have no doubt 

that people on the other side of the political aisle from Professor Falk are as troubled by 

his having a visiting appointment at Chapman as others are by John Yoo's appointment, 

but students and faculty of every political stripe have found his presence here to be both 

stimulating and thought-provoking, and we fully expect the same result from Professor 

Yoo's visit. 

 

Finally, I would encourage those who object to Professor Yoo's appointment here to read 

his scholarly work on the subject of Executive power, and in particular the memos he 

authored while serving in the administration.  Read, too, the full range of serious 

commentary on that work.  You will find that Yoo's position, while disputed, is far from 

ignorant or disrespectful of the Constitution.  No less a constitutional law scholar than 

Harvard's Alan Dershowitz had made similar constitutional arguments in favor of 

executive power in time of war.  See, for example, 

http://www.opinionjournal.com/editorial/feature.html?id=110010832. 

 

In the wake of 9/11, President Bush pledged to use every legal and constitutional tool at 

his disposal to prevent another attack on our homeland.  Some of the task of identifying 

the line between legal and illegal, constitutional and unconstitutional, fell to Professor 

Yoo during his time of service in the administration.  Many believe his legal analysis was 

flawed, but others, serious constitutional scholars and historians among them, think he 

got it right or at least made a fair stab at it.  The opportunity to explore some of the most 

profoundly important legal questions of our age with someone who was actually present 

and involved in the them, whether it be Professor Falk or Professor Yoo, is a phenomenal 

opportunity for our students, even (and perhaps especially) those who vehemently 

disagree with the positions they have taken.  As Dean Edley noted, that is the mark of a 

truly great law school, and I am honored to say that Chapman is increasingly worthy of 

being considered in such company, in no small measure due to prominent appointments 

such as Richard Falk and John Yoo. 

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Important Reading

Physicians for Human Rights
Broken Laws, Broken Lives

NLG White Paper
ON THE LAW OF TORTURE...

The President's Executioner

Detention and torture in Guantanamo





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